John Bowers | Newcastle University

John Bowers | Newcastle University

Keynote speaker

John Bowers is an artist-researcher working within Culture Lab with a particular interest in the use of art and design-led methods (Research Through Design) to explore digital technologies and novel interaction concepts. He also works as a sound artist improvising with electronic, digital, acoustic and electro-mechanical devices and self-made instruments in performance and installation settings, typically accompanied by live digital image. His work is often grounded in field research methods drawn from the social sciences (ethnography, interaction analysis) and related to theoretical and practical issues in Human Computer Interaction (HCI), design research, material culture, media archeology and critical theory. He leads Culture Lab's research on Digital Media.

Helen Kennedy | The University of Sheffield

Helen Kennedy | The University of Sheffield

Keynote speaker

Helen Kennedy is Professor of Digital Society at the University of Sheffield. Her research has focused on: social media, data in society, data visualisation, inequality, web design, digital identity. Recent work includes a) Seeing Data (www.seeingdata.org), which explored how non-experts relate to data visualisations, and b) Post, Mine, Repeat (2016), about what happens when social media data mining becomes ordinary (both funded by the AHRC). She is interested in critical approaches to big data and data visualisations, how people live with data, how to make datafication and its consequences transparent, and whether it’s possible to ‘live well’ with data.

Michiel de Lange | Utrecht University

Michiel de Lange | Utrecht University

Keynote speaker

Michiel de Lange is an Assistant Professor in New Media Studies, Department of Media and Culture Studies, Utrecht University; co-founder of The Mobile City, a platform for the study of new media and urbanism; advisor e-culture at Mediafonds; and works as a researcher in the field of (mobile) media, urban culture, identity and play. Since April 1 2015, he is a researcher in the NWO Creative Industries funded project “The Hackable City”, about the ways digital media shape the future of city making. In 2010 Michiel completed his PhD dissertation at the Erasmus University of Rotterdam (Faculty of Philosophy) called “Moving Circles: mobile media and playful identities”. It is about the way mobile media technologies shape the construction of personal and cultural identities in urban settings. De Lange was trained as an anthropologist at the University of Amsterdam, and studied Industrial Design and Management for a year at the TU Delft. De Lange studies, writes, gives talks, and organizes events about media technologies in the city.

Anders Koed Madsen | Aalborg University

Anders Koed Madsen | Aalborg University

Keynote speaker

Anders Koed Madsen is Associate Professor at Aalborg University Copenhagen, where he is part of the Techno-Anthropoloical Laboratory (tantlab.aau.dk). With a background in Internet Studies and Organizational Studies, his research adresses the relation between new digital methods, public engagement and organizational sense-making. Anders´ recent publications unfolds this topic in two ways. One line of his work inquires into Big Data practices as a socio-technical infrastructure that affects conceptions of expertise and regimes of valuation in cotexts like international development. Another line of his work is fueled by a more explicit interventionist ambition. Together with colleagues at TANTLab, he has recently been engaged in a series of data-sprints exploring the ways in which digital methods affords new ways of understanding the public and organizing processes of public engagement.

Noortje Marres | University of Warwick

Noortje Marres | University of Warwick

Keynote speaker

Noortje Marres is Associate Professor in the Centre for Interdisciplinary Methodologies at the University of Warwick. She studied Sociology and Philosophy of Science and Technology at the University of Amsterdam and her work investigates issues at the intersection between technology, politics and the environment: problems of participation in technological societies; the role of objects and materials in contemporary democracy (with a focus on sustainable living), the changing relations between social science and society in the digital age. Her second main interest is digital social research, in particular the development of digital methods and tools of controversy analysis and issue mapping. Her book, Digital Sociology: The Reinvention of Social Research will come out in Spring 2017 (Polity).

Alex Taylor | Microsoft Research Cambridge

Alex Taylor | Microsoft Research Cambridge

Keynote speaker

Alex Taylor is a sociologist working at Microsoft Research Cambridge. He has undertaken investigations into a range of routine and often mundane aspects of everyday life. For instance, he's developed what some might see as an unhealthy preoccupation with hoarding, dirt, clutter and similar seemingly banal subject matter. Most recently, he’s begun obsessing over computation and wondering what the compulsion for seeing-data-everywhere might mean for the future of humans and machines.

Clara Crivellaro | Newcastle University

Clara Crivellaro | Newcastle University

Workshop leader & organiser

Clara Crivellaro is a designer, creative practitioner and a post-doc researcher at Newcastle University’s Open Lab. Her research explores design-led methods, digital tools and processes to support progressive forms of social activism in and for the everyday politics of place and place-making. Her background is in Arts and Design (BA) and Curatorial practice (MA) and has worked as a freelance artist on a range of participatory projects with a charities, NGOs and cultural institutions in UK and Europe.

David Moats | Linköping University

David Moats | Linköping University

Workshop leader & speaker

David’s work concerns the use of Big Data and Digital Methods in the social sciences informed by work from Science and Technology Studies (STS). In his PhD, at Goldsmiths, University of London, he developed novel techniques, tools and data visualisations for studying public issues online. David is currently undertaking a postdoc at Linköping University about the role of visual representations in data analytics: collaborating with data scientists in a variety of fields (market research, census data, smart cities, sports etc.) to develop new types of visualisations which approach data in more open, exploratory and interpretive ways.